Review roundup

Life has been busy, no time to blog. But always time to read. Here’s a quick roundup of what I’ve read since the last update:

20893314A Brief History of Seven Killings: Violence and conspiracy in 1970s Jamaica as several characters encircle the little known assassination attempt of Bob Marley. The lengthy, smart dialogue matched up with the stream of consciousness point of view, coupled with the long and shifting list of characters gives you the feeling that The Wire, Quentin Tarantino and William Faulkner were placed in a blender.

It’s good, but too long. Some characters bleed into eachother, some chapters seem completely unnecessary.

 

 

7950980Tropic of Cancer: Life is a pretty much a shifting, slimy, disgusting morass. A sewer. Except when it’s not. Henry Miller’s amoral disillusionment with life, while he wanders around Paris, broke, is interesting but has largely lost the shocking relevance of its initial publication.

Shameful that the US censored this for a good thirty years in any case.

 

 

6617037Debt: The First 5,000 Years: When I was a kid, elementary school teachers
taught us that blood in your veins is
blue, and blood in your arteries is red. Your blue blood only turns red when you’re wounded because of its reaction to oxygen. When I learned much later that this was complete bullshit, I was outraged and astounded. Why teach kids a pointless lie??

Why is this relevant? Well, because the beginning of Debt outlines that the myth of barter — that one dude is trading a bundle of fish for another dude’s socks — that is taught to every child in America is also false! And I’m mad about that too!

Credit came first, then coinage. And the credit came back. And then coinage. And now, as of Richard Nixon delinking the dollar from the gold standard in the 70s, we’re embarking on yet another credit cycle.

 

White Like Me by Tim WiseWhite Like Me: Reflections on Race from a Privileged Son: A sort of racism 101, told by a white guy occasionally revealing amusing or insightful anecdotes.

His most important point w/r/t white people talking to white people about race is the erasure of white resistance in history. For example, hundreds of thousands of southern whites deserted or protested rather than fight in the civil war. By silencing them, Wise points out that you deny whites the historic knowledge that you have a choice.

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s